Meadowlark Marsh

Category: Candidate Restoration/Preservation Site

Location: Located north of Bellman’s Creek and east of the New Jersey Turnpike – Eastern Spur in Ridgefield, Bergen County.

Latitude/Longitude: 40.82120/-74.02449

Current Land Use: Tidal marsh

Size: 90 acres

Current Ownership: Hartz Mountain Development Corporation, but NJMC is in the process of acquiring the site.

Site Description: The Meadowlark Marsh site is currently undeveloped and dominated by common reed (Phragmites australis), but dotted with staghorn sumac (Rhus hirta) and black cherry (Prunus serotina) trees. Site elevations range from approximately 15 feet in the upland forest to 1-foot along Bellman’s Creek. It appears that runoff from development along Westside Avenue is a possible source of freshwater for several ponds contained on site. The land is visited frequently by feeding ducks including green-winged teal (Anas crecca), and is a popular nesting area for red-winged black birds (Agelaius phoeniceus). This site has also been known as the Meadowlark Tract and Bellman’s Creek Site.

Existing Site-Specific Data Inventory

A. Survey, Maps, and GIS

HMD regional data exists inclusive of this site.

B. Real Estate/Ownership

Owned by Hartz Mountain Development Corporation, but is in the process of being acquired by NJMC.

C. Site History & Land Use

Existing conditions surveyed at the site in 1997. Preliminary hazardous materials assessment completed in 2003.

D. Biological Studies – Fauna

General wildlife and environmental data was collected in 1993 and 1997 for site assessments.

E. Biological Studies – General Environmental

Wetland assessments conducted in 1993, 1997, and 2003. Preliminary hazardous materials assessment completed in 2003.

F. Geotechnical

General soils data was collected for a 1997 site assessment.

G. Hydraulics and Hydrology

General hydrology data was collected for a 1997 site assessment.

H. Water and Sediments

General sediment data was collected for a 1997 site assessment.

I. Historical/Cultural Resources

Existing cultural resources information was compiled for a 1997 site assessment.

J. Restoration/Remediation Design Plans

Conceptual restoration plan was developed in 1986. Development of a conceptual restoration plan was evaluated for a 1997 site assessment.

 

Site Reports

Site #20 – Meadowlark Marsh

Category: Candidate Restoration/Preservation Site

Location: Located north of Bellman’s Creek and east of the New Jersey Turnpike – Eastern Spur in Ridgefield, Bergen County.

Latitude/Longitude: 40.82120 / -74.02449

Current Land Use: Tidal marsh

Size: 90 acres

Current Ownership: Hartz Mountain Development Corporation, but NJMC is in the process of acquiring the site.

Site Description: The Meadowlark Marsh site is currently undeveloped and dominated by common reed (Phragmites australis), but dotted with staghorn sumac (Rhus hirta) and black cherry (Prunus serotina) trees. Site elevations range from approximately 15 feet in the upland forest to 1-foot along Bellman’s Creek. It appears that runoff from development along Westside Avenue is a possible source of freshwater for several ponds contained on site. The land is visited frequently by feeding ducks including green-winged teal (Anas crecca), and is a popular nesting area for red-winged black birds (Agelaius phoeniceus). This site has also been known as the Meadowlark Tract and the Bellman’s Creek Site.

Existing Site Specific Data Inventory

* – Report repeated under multiple data categories and/or sites.

A.  Survey, Maps, and GIS

Relevant survey, mapping, and GIS data for the Meadowlands can be found in the Meadowlands-wide site report under data category A.

B.   Real Estate/Ownership

Meadowlark Marsh is owned by Hartz Mountain Development Corporation; however, it is in the process of being acquired by NJMC.

C.  Site History & Land Use

1.      *Louis Berger & Associates, Inc. Bellman’s Creek Site: Assessment of 90-acre Site in the Hackensack Meadowlands District. August, 1997. [4]Assessment of site (called Bellman’s Creek Site, but now known as the Meadowlark Marsh site) included the review of existing wildlife, land use (including wetlands), soils, hydrologic, sediment, and cultural resources information, as well as the collection of new data during a field investigation. Wetland functional value scores were also developed. The site was determined to be a potential wetland mitigation bank site, but would require a Phase II study of a spoil pile, a subsurface investigation program, and a culvert linking the northern and central sections to restore tidal flow to the central section.

2.      *PMK Group, Preliminary Assessment Report Meadowlark Site. December 2003. [1a]This preliminary Phase 1 assessment evaluated the potential for hazardous material to exist on the property at levels likely to warrant mitigation, through site reconnaissance, and reviews of maps, historical information, and government agency listings.

D.  Biological Studies – Fauna

3.      *Louis Berger & Associates, Inc. Bellman’s Creek Site: Assessment of 90-acre Site in the Hackensack Meadowlands District. August, 1997. [2a]Assessment of site (called Bellman’s Creek Site, but now known as the Meadowlark Marsh site) included the review of existing wildlife, wetland/upland areas, soils, hydrologic, sediment, and cultural resources information, as well as the collection of new data during a field investigation. Wetland functional value scores were also developed. The site was determined to be a potential wetland mitigation bank site, but would require a Phase II study of a spoil pile, a subsurface investigation program, and a culvert linking the northern and central sections to restore tidal flow to the central section.

E.   Biological Studies – General Environmental

4.      *Louis Berger & Associates, Inc. Bellman’s Creek Site: Assessment of 90-acre Site in the Hackensack Meadowlands District. August, 1997. [2a]Assessment of site (called Bellman’s Creek Site, but now known as the Meadowlark Marsh site) included the review of existing wildlife, wetland/upland areas, soils, hydrologic, sediment, and cultural resources information, as well as the collection of new data during a field investigation. Wetland functional value scores were also developed. The site was determined to be a potential wetland mitigation bank site, but would require a Phase II study of a spoil pile, a subsurface investigation program, and a culvert linking the northern and central sections to restore tidal flow to the central section.

5.      *The Louis Berger Group, Inc. Hydrogeomorphic (HGM) Functional Assessment Model and Guidebook for Tidal Fringe Wetlands in the New Jersey Meadowlands. 2003. [1a](http://merilibrary.meadowlands.state.nj.us/dbtw-wpd/FullText/HGM_guidebook_RVSD.pdf) A hydrogeomorphic functional assessment model and guidebook for tidal fringe wetlands in the Hackensack Meadowlands was completed. The HGM model can be used as a tool to help determine wetland functions and values and to approximate compensatory wetland mitigation. Map-based and on-site field data (including amount of aquatic edge, channel density, vegetative cover, habitat, soil texture, and tidal inundation) were collected from the reference wetlands and used to refine data collection forms, calibrate model variables, and improve the conceptual HGM functional models. Reference sites included Skeetkill Creek Marsh, Meadowlark Marsh, Lyndhurst Riverside Marsh, MRI, Western Brackish Marsh, Mill Creek Marsh, Eastern Brackish Marsh, Mori Tract, Walden Marsh, Oritani Marsh, Harrier Meadow, Anderson Creek Marsh, Kearny Brackish Marsh, and Riverbend Wetlands Preserve.

6.      *PMK Group, Preliminary Assessment Report Meadowlark Site. December 2003. [1a]This preliminary Phase 1 assessment evaluated the potential for hazardous material to exist on the property at levels likely to warrant mitigation, through site reconnaissance, and reviews of maps, historical information, and government agency listings.

7.      TAMS Consultants, Inc. Functional Evaluation of the Villages at Mill Creek Development and Mitigation Sites. March 1993. [2] Qualitatively evaluates the functional opportunity/effectiveness of wetlands at four sites – IR-2 (now the Mill Creek Wetland Mitigation Site), Anderson Creek Marsh, South Secaucus (also known as Riverbend Wetlands Preserve), and Meadowlark Marsh – based on physical, chemical, and biological attributes.

F.   Geotechnical

8.      *Louis Berger & Associates, Inc. Bellman’s Creek Site: Assessment of 90-acre Site in the Hackensack Meadowlands District. August, 1997. [2a]Assessment of site (called Bellman’s Creek Site, but now known as the Meadowlark Marsh site) included the review of existing wildlife, wetland/upland areas, soils, hydrologic, sediment, and cultural resources information, as well as the collection of new data during a field investigation. Wetland functional value scores were also developed. The site was determined to be a potential wetland mitigation bank site, but would require a Phase II study of a spoil pile, a subsurface investigation program, and a culvert linking the northern and central sections to restore tidal flow to the central section.

G.  Hydraulics and Hydrology

9.      *Louis Berger & Associates, Inc. Bellman’s Creek Site: Assessment of 90-acre Site in the Hackensack Meadowlands District. August, 1997. [2a]Assessment of site (called Bellman’s Creek Site, but now known as the Meadowlark Marsh site) included the review of existing wildlife, wetland/upland areas, soils, hydrologic, sediment, and cultural resources information, as well as the collection of new data during a field investigation. Wetland functional value scores were also developed. The site was determined to be a potential wetland mitigation bank site, but would require a Phase II study of a spoil pile, a subsurface investigation program, and a culvert linking the northern and central sections to restore tidal flow to the central section.

H.  Water and Sediments

10.  *Louis Berger & Associates, Inc. Bellman’s Creek Site: Assessment of 90-acre Site in the Hackensack Meadowlands District. August, 1997. [2a]Assessment of site (called Bellman’s Creek Site, but now known as the Meadowlark Marsh site) included the review of existing wildlife, wetland/upland areas, soils, hydrologic, sediment, and cultural resources information, as well as the collection of new data during a field investigation. Wetland functional value scores were also developed. The site was determined to be a potential wetland mitigation bank site, but would require a Phase II study of a spoil pile, a subsurface investigation program, and a culvert linking the northern and central sections to restore tidal flow to the central section.

I.    Historical/Cultural Resources

11.  *Louis Berger & Associates, Inc. Bellman’s Creek Site: Assessment of 90-acre Site in the Hackensack Meadowlands District. August, 1997. [2a]Assessment of site (called Bellman’s Creek Site, but now known as the Meadowlark Marsh site) included the review of existing wildlife, wetland/upland areas, soils, hydrologic, sediment, and cultural resources information, as well as the collection of new data during a field investigation. Wetland functional value scores were also developed. The site was determined to be a potential wetland mitigation bank site, but would require a Phase II study of a spoil pile, a subsurface investigation program, and a culvert linking the northern and central sections to restore tidal flow to the central section.

J.   Restoration/Remediation Design Plans

12.  *Louis Berger & Associates, Inc. Bellman’s Creek Site: Assessment of 90-acre Site in the Hackensack Meadowlands District. August, 1997. [2a]Assessment of site (called Bellman’s Creek Site, but now known as the Meadowlark Marsh site) included the review of existing wildlife, wetland/upland areas, soils, hydrologic, sediment, and cultural resources information, as well as the collection of new data during a field investigation. Wetland functional value scores were also developed. The site was determined to be a potential wetland mitigation bank site, but would require a Phase II study of a spoil pile, a subsurface investigation program, and a culvert linking the northern and central sections to restore tidal flow to the central section.

13.  *TAMS Consultants, Inc. The Villages at Mill Creek (IR-2) Brackish Wetland Mitigation Concept. May 1986. [2] Quantifies the net impact of filling 97.41 acres of USACE-regulated wetlands and enhancing 91.98 acres for the construction of the proposed Villages at Mill Creek.

K. Bibliographic Updates                   

Site #20: Meadowlark Marsh